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dc.contributor.authorDahling, Jason
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Mindi N.
dc.date.accessioned2017-12-20T21:26:33Z
dc.date.available2017-12-20T21:26:33Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.citationDahling, J.J., & Thompson, M.N. (2013). Detrimental relations of maximization with academic and career attitudes. Journal of Career Assessment, 21, 278-294.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1177/1069072712471322
dc.descriptionDepartment of Psychologyen_US
dc.description.abstractMaximization refers to a decision-making style that involves seeking the single best option when making a choice, which is generally dysfunctional because people are limited in their ability to rationally evaluate all options and identify the single best outcome. The vocational consequences of maximization are examined in two samples, college students and working adults. After controlling for trait perfectionistic striving, highly maximizing students reported lower satisfaction and perceived fit with their majors, higher academic turnover cognitions, and lower career decision self-efficacy (Study 1). Similarly, highly maximizing adults reported less satisfaction and perceived fit with their jobs, higher employment turnover cognitions, and less satisfaction with the progression of their careers (Study 2). In both studies, the relations of maximization and these outcomes were mediated by negative affect, pointing to feelings of regret and frustration as a mechanism that drives these negative appraisals. Implications for practice and directions for future research are discussed.en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.publisherSage Publicationsen_US
dc.subjectCareer decision makingen_US
dc.subjectDecision stylesen_US
dc.subjectJob attitudesen_US
dc.subjectSatisfactionen_US
dc.subjectPerson-job fiten_US
dc.subjectTurnover intentionsen_US
dc.subjectNegative affecten_US
dc.titleDetrimental relations of maximization with academic and career attitudesen_US
dc.typeArticleen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
prism.publicationNameJournal of Career Assessment
prism.volume21
prism.issueIdentifier2
prism.publicationDate2013
prism.startingPage278
prism.endingPage294
dc.identifier.handlehttps://dr.tcnj.edu/handle/2900/1956


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