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dc.contributor.authorMiller, Andrewen_US
dc.contributor.authorGould, Nathanen_US
dc.contributor.authorPapamichail, Dimitrisen_US
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-06T18:04:17Z
dc.date.available2015-11-06T18:04:17Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.descriptionDepartment of Computer Scienceen_US
dc.description.abstractIn the field of textual criticism, scholars use stemmatics in order to recreate an extinct original text from a collection of extant copied texts. Stemmatic trees are used to represent the relationship between extant and hypothetical extinct texts. The relations between extant texts can be used to create a tree mapping out which texts descend from other texts. These trees are usually assessed for parsimony, which assumes that the simplest solution is most probable. For example, if a stemmatic tree relies on a large amount of hypothetical extinct documents relating the extant documents then it is less convincing. We have no evidence that these extinct documents even exist. Textual critics have used phylogenetic software to generate stemmatic trees. Phylogenetic software was designed to model the evolution of organisms.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipMUSE (Mentored Undergraduate Summer Experience)en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipCollege of New Jersey (Ewing, N.J.). Office of Academic Affairsen_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsFile access restricted due to FERPA regulationsen_US
dc.titleMaximum Parsimony Advances for Native Phylogenetic Stemmaticsen_US
dc.typePosteren_US
dc.typePresentationen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.identifier.handlehttps://dr.tcnj.edu/handle/2900/242


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