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dc.contributor.authorHinckson, Afia
dc.contributor.authorAromolaran, Damilola
dc.contributor.authorAtkins, Rahshida
dc.contributor.authorPontes, Nancy
dc.contributor.authorPatterson, Natasha
dc.contributor.authorMcCray, April
dc.contributor.authorPontes, Manny
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-09T18:32:18Z
dc.date.available2022-03-09T18:32:18Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://dr.tcnj.edu/handle/2900/3889
dc.descriptionDepartment of Nursingen_US
dc.description.abstractNew Jersey has among the highest racial disparity between African American/Black vs White infant mortality (8.8 compared to 2.3 per 1000 live births). In published studies, Black/African American - White racial disparity (measured by risk ratio) actually increases with greater maternal education. The purposes of this study are 1) to estimate infant mortality by maternal education and race; and 2) to determine the extent to which education levels are associated with the reduction of disparities due to maternal race (Black vs. White; Hispanic vs. White).en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipCollege of New Jersey (Ewing, N.J.). Office of Academic Affairsen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipMUSE (Mentored Undergraduate Summer Experience)en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsFile access restricted due to FERPA regulationsen_US
dc.titleHealth disparities: the effects of race/ethnicity and maternal education on infant mortalityen_US
dc.typePosteren_US
dc.typePresentationen_US
dc.typeTexten_US


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