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dc.contributor.authorTurner, Jessica
dc.contributor.authorPereda, Bernard
dc.contributor.authorHerres, Joanna
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-14T14:28:43Z
dc.date.available2022-03-14T14:28:43Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://dr.tcnj.edu/handle/2900/3903
dc.descriptionDepartment of Psychologyen_US
dc.description.abstractOne in five women experience campus sexual assault (CSA) at some point during college (Muehlenhard et al., 2017). Victims may disclose their CSA to formal or informal supports. Victims feel more comfortable reporting to Informal supports such as peers, and family ((Dworkin, Brill, & Ullman, 2019; Starzynski et al., 2005). Formal supports such as, police, campus resources and doctor are more likely to give negative social reactions. Negative social reactions result in risk of PTSD. The hypotheses for this study are 1) that disclosure to a formal source will predict more negative social reactions (NSR) and more severe PTSD symptoms; and 2) that unsupportive acknowledgement reactions will mediate a link between disclosing to a formal source and more severe PTSD symptoms.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipCollege of New Jersey (Ewing, N.J.). Office of Academic Affairsen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipMUSE (Mentored Undergraduate Summer Experience)en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsFile access restricted due to FERPA regulationsen_US
dc.titleDisclosing campus sexual assault to formal support systems increases posttraumatic stress symptoms due to more negative social reactionsen_US
dc.typePosteren_US
dc.typePresentationen_US
dc.typeTexten_US


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