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dc.contributor.authorPereda, Bernard
dc.contributor.authorHerres, Joanna
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-14T14:37:24Z
dc.date.available2022-03-14T14:37:24Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://dr.tcnj.edu/handle/2900/3904
dc.descriptionDepartment of Psychologyen_US
dc.description.abstractDepressive symptoms (DSs) and alcohol-related problems (ARPs) are highly correlated among college students (e.g., Merrill et al., 2014) and can result in worse treatment outcomes (e.g., Rohde et al., 2001), issues with energy and sleep (Foster et al., 1999), and lowered academic performance (e.g., White & Hingson, 2013). Studying the direction of effects - or the sequential and predictive relationship - between DSs and ARPs could help identify individuals at high risk of these conditions. Currently, the literature presents inconsistent evidence for the directional relationship between DSs and ARPs throughout the course of the academic year. We hypothesized that DSs and ARPs would trigger each other over time, resulting in a bidirectional relationship. We also explored whether the direction of effects differs for male- and female-identified students.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipCollege of New Jersey (Ewing, N.J.). Office of Academic Affairsen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipMUSE (Mentored Undergraduate Summer Experience)en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsFile access restricted due to FERPA regulationsen_US
dc.titleThe direction of effects between depression symptoms and alcohol-related problems in college studentsen_US
dc.typePosteren_US
dc.typePresentationen_US
dc.typeTexten_US


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