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dc.contributor.authorBolle, Camila
dc.contributor.authorSnyder, Christopher
dc.contributor.authorKress, Tracy L.
dc.date.accessioned2022-03-14T17:13:05Z
dc.date.available2022-03-14T17:13:05Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.urihttp://dr.tcnj.edu/handle/2900/3913
dc.descriptionDepartment of Biologyen_US
dc.description.abstractGene expression is a tightly regulated process that involves properly synthesizing an RNA transcript from DNA, and splicing it correctly to prepare it for proper translation into a protein. We focused on two key steps: transcription, where an RNA transcript is copied from DNA, and RNA splicing, an aspect of RNA processing in which non protein coding regions, known as introns, are removed from the RNA. It has been previously shown that these two processes can occur simultaneously, providing cells with a way to regulate their gene expression. This coupling of steps is known as co-transcriptional splicing. While many of the genes and proteins responsible for transcription and splicing have been identified, it is still largely unknown exactly which components of gene expression interact with one another to facilitate this coupling. One aspect of this is the effects of histone modifications on splicing. The more tightly wrapped the DNA is around the nucleosome, comprised of 8 histones, the more inaccessible it is to proteins which promote transcription. Chemical modifications to these histone proteins can result in wrapping the DNA more loosely or tightly, impacting gene expression, and allowing certain genes to be “turned on” or “turned off”, according to the needs of the cell. Here we investigated the acetylation of histone H4. Histone point mutations prevent the acetylation of certain amino acid residues in the histone, which impact chromatin structure and alter gene expression. H4 is acetylated by the NuA4 histone acetyltransferase. Histones can be also replaced by variant histones, impacting the chemical modifications and levels of expression of that area of the chromosome. One example of this is the histone variant H2A.Z (a.k.a Htz1p). This variant replaces the H2A histone through interactions between Swr1p and the NuA4 complex. We investigated whether the NuA4 complex function and HTZ1 impacted splicing. Using genetic interaction studies, we revealed genetic interactions between mutations that impact H4 acetylation and several splicing factor genes, implicating H4 acetylation in RNA splicing. In addition, we show that mutation of H4 or mutations that impair the function of the NuA4 complex both impact RNA splicing. In addition to monitoring splicing in haploid cells, we also monitor splicing during meiosis. There are a special class of intron-containing genes required for meiosis and they are regulated by the Mer1 protein. We induced MER1 in wild type yeast, as well as in single mutants that impact H4 acetylation and H2A.Z deposition, and measured splicing to determine if Mer1-regulated splicing is impacted. We also investigated genetic interactions between RNA14, a 3’ end processing gene, and histone variant HTZ1, to determine if 3’ end processing, which occurs after splicing to prepare the RNA transcript for nuclear export, is coupled with chromatin modification.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipCollege of New Jersey (Ewing, N.J.). Office of Academic Affairsen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipMUSE (Mentored Undergraduate Summer Experience)en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsFile access restricted due to FERPA regulationsen_US
dc.titleCoupling between key steps in gene expression: a role for the NuA4 histone acetyltransferase and the variant histone Htz1 in co-transcriptional RNA processingen_US
dc.typePosteren_US
dc.typePresentationen_US
dc.typeTexten_US


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