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dc.contributor.authorBorg, Alex
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, Dale
dc.contributor.authorLawrence, Summer
dc.contributor.authorLivingston, Eric W.
dc.contributor.authorHeinz, Robert D.
dc.contributor.authorDavis, Catherine M.
dc.contributor.authorLau, Anthony G.
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-04T16:49:34Z
dc.date.available2017-02-04T16:49:34Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.descriptionDepartment of Biomedical Engineeringen_US
dc.description.abstractSpaceflight leaves astronauts at risk for negative consequences to bone health. A long term mission of NASA has been to send a manned mission to mars. Taking over a month for astronauts to reach Mars, long term effects occur within bone structure as density is lost. The mechanisms that cause this to occur are still uncertain and lead to difficulties in prevention. Before a mission to mars may take place, these health concerns must be studied and resolved. Shown in a separate study, astronauts returning from extended exposure to heavy ions coupled with unloading in space, bone was incompletely regenerated 5 years after returning to Earth [1]. While in the vertebrae and femoral neck bone loss can range from 0.8-1.5% per month, other bone sites can be upwards of 2% per month [1]. This study will focus on the femoral neck region which is a clinically relevant sight for fractures due to its load bearing functionality.en_US
dc.description.sponsorshipCollege of New Jersey (Ewing, N.J.). Office of Academic Affairsen_US
dc.description.sponsorshipMUSE (Mentored Undergraduate Summer Experience)en_US
dc.language.isoen_USen_US
dc.rightsFile access restricted due to FERPA regulations
dc.titleModeling space radiation induced bone loss in rat femurs through finite element analysisen_US
dc.typePosteren_US
dc.typePresentationen_US
dc.typeTexten_US
dc.identifier.handlehttps://dr.tcnj.edu/handle/2900/798


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